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"Summer Reads" is the new exhibit at the Guin Library at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The exhibit was created by library student aides Abigail Mason and Athena Botbola, and it features reading suggestions from staff at the Marine Science Center. The exhibit's background is made of folded and pasted paper from discarded books.

"Summer Reads" is the new exhibit at the Guin Library at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The exhibit was created by library student aides Abigail Mason and Athena Botbola, and it features reading suggestions from staff at the Marine Science Center. The exhibit's background is made of folded and pasted paper from discarded books.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age opens on August 6 at the Valley Library. An opening reception will take place at 4:00 on the 6th, and you're invited. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope.” 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016 in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Center Reading Room on the fifth floor of the Valley Library. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

A new website developed by OSU Libraries highlights the architecture of the Pacific Northwest and offers a wealth of photos and information about historically significant buildings in Oregon. Buildingoregon.org is a digital library that includes a collection of thousands of images of more than 5,000 cultural and historic properties. 

OSU Libraries developed the website that makes the University of Oregon’s “Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest” collection accessible to users on smart phones and other mobile devices. Building Oregon uses a map-based interface to allow people to search for buildings by location and retrieve related images and information. Many photos in the collection represent cultural heritage sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

“This grant project is a terrific example of ongoing collaboration between Oregon State University and the University of Oregon,” according to Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “It leverages our respective strengths within each library to enhance access to important cultural content. Of course, I am especially pleased with OSU’s development work on this project as we’ve created an open technical framework for other cultural heritage entities such as museums, archives and presses to use to reach wider audiences.”

The development of the Building Oregon website was supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services Technology Act and administered by the Oregon State Library. The open source code for this application is available via GitHub. 

A new website developed by OSU Libraries highlights the architecture of the Pacific Northwest and offers a wealth of photos and information about historically significant buildings in Oregon. Buildingoregon.org is a digital library that includes a collection of thousands of images of more than 5,000 cultural and historic properties. 

OSU Libraries developed the website that makes the University of Oregon’s “Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest” collection accessible to users on smart phones and other mobile devices. Building Oregon uses a map-based interface to allow people to search for buildings by location and retrieve related images and information. Many photos in the collection represent cultural heritage sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

“This grant project is a terrific example of ongoing collaboration between Oregon State University and the University of Oregon,” according to Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director. “It leverages our respective strengths within each library to enhance access to important cultural content. Of course, I am especially pleased with OSU’s development work on this project as we’ve created an open technical framework for other cultural heritage entities such as museums, archives and presses to use to reach wider audiences.”

The development of the Building Oregon website was supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services Technology Act and administered by the Oregon State Library. The open source code for this application is available via GitHub. 

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