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O R E G O N S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y
L I B R A R I E S A N D P R E S S
S P
Learn all about Waldo Hall at
History Comes Alive
by Rhonda Hankins, Editor
S
tudents taking Professor James H. Capshew’s Digital
History class explored primary documents in the
Special Collections and Archives Research Center
(SCARC) and then created a website on Waldo Hall, one of
the older buildings on campus. In addition to learning the
facts about the building and some new technical skills, the
students gained profound insights into how history is
recorded.
Larry Landis
, Director of SCARC, and
Tiah Edmunson-
Morton
, Archives Reference and Instruction Coordinator,
provided on-site instruction into the relevant collections.
“They were invaluable consultants throughout the class,
answering questions, supplying leads to materials, and
strategizing with individual students about research plans,”
noted Professor Capshew.
In selecting items for the online exhibit, students learned
firsthand how their choices as historians impact the story
that is told. Tiah said it is a powerful experience for students
to realize how much room for interpretation there is when
working with primary documents. They may never read a
history book the same way again.
“Spending so much time searching through old documents and photographs from
the early twentieth century was fascinating for the project and also gave me a
deeper appreciation for Corvallis and OSU in general,” said history major Adam La
Mascus, who is also a student worker in SCARC.
OSUHistory Highlights
by Tiah Edmunson-Morton, Archivist for Instruction & Outreach
W
hen history major Buddy Martin started his in-
ternship with SCARC, he wanted to learn more
about campus history, hone his research and
writing skills, and hang out with archivists. His project was
a formidable task: create a short “OSU History Highlights”
presentation on OSU’s nearly 150-year history. We asked him
to not only research, but also to create an engaging presen-
tation, think about audience, and consider professional and
ethical practices when presenting history to the public. As
the term progressed, Buddy realized the yearbooks provided
enough stories to justify creating several long presentations.
He’s done such a great job this term we’ve asked him to
come back next year—but this time as a student worker.
History major Buddy Martin poring over turn-of-the-century yearbooks.
Read Buddy’s blog post about this project at
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