OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Ecampus News

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The Resident Scholar program, sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries, awards stipends of up to $2,500 per month to visiting researchers whose proposals detail a compelling potential use of the materials held in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Three scholars have been selected for summer 2016. 

Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students as well as independent scholars are welcome to apply, and the resident scholars do a talk about their research topic at the conclusion of their residency. Information about these lectures will be available later after these lectures are scheduled. 

Resident scholars are given full ($2,500) or half ($1,250) scholarships per month that are renewable up to three months (for a total maximum grant award of $7,500). A new round of scholarship applications will be solicited in January 2017. 

Here are the award recipients for 2016 and descriptions of their proposals: 

Annessa Babic, faculty, New York Institute of Technology

“Safety for Our Souls: Food Activism and the Environmental and Women’s Movements, 1960s-1990s”

August 2016 visit

Babic is doing an inquiry into the connections between women's activism in the environmental and feminist movements and changes in American food ways. She seeks to place food activism in the larger context of what was occurring politically and socially across the United States during the 1960s-1990s. Babic has identified several collections to review, including the Food Science and Technology Department Records, the Nutrition and Food Management Department Records, and the Oregon State Dames Club Records, among many others.

  

Jason Hogstad, Ph.D. student, University of Colorado (recently completed master’s degree at Washington State University; entering Ph.D. program at University of Colorado in the fall)

"War on Rabbits Begins Sunday: Pest Control and the Urban/Rural Divide in Eastern Oregon, 1900-1930"

June/July 2016 visit 

Hogstad is developing an examination of the social impact of different forms of pest control, with specific focus on the transition from communal rabbit drives to state-directed poisoning as a reflection of the shift in how eastern Oregonians responded to environmental crisis and, in the process, illuminated the gulf between urban and rural communities in Oregon. Hogstad’s research will focus primarily on the Agricultural Experiment Station Records and the Extension Service Records.

 

Michael Kenny, emeritus, Simon Fraser University (Burnaby, B.C.)

"Linus Pauling, Eugenics, and the Bomb"

July 2016 visit 

Kenny’s work is a study looking to add further insight into Linus Pauling's views on eugenics through the prism of his research and rhetoric on the long-term genetic dangers of atomic radiation. This research at the Valley Library will build upon a paper that Kenny delivered at a 2013 symposium on scientific recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Don't leave your backpack or electronics unattended in the library or in other public areas on campus as thefts do occur. 

If you’d like to store your items in a secure place at the library, lockers are located throughout the Valley Library and may be reserved at Circulation on the second floor near the library’s main entrance. 

If you see a theft or other crime in progress, immediately call 541-737-7000. For non-emergencies, such as to report a theft after it has occurred, call OSU Security at 541-737-3010.

The Valley Library has another resident scholar lecture coming up soon. Melody Owen is a visual artist based in Portland that has shown her work all across the country as well as in Europe. She has completed residencies in France, Switzerland, and Iceland among several other locations. 

Owen conducted research in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center last autumn and focused on historic images of foresters and others working in the woods. Her talk titled “Tree Rings” will be delivered on Thursday, June 16 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East Room on the library’s third floor. We’ll hope to see you there, and her description of her presentation is below. 

This talk will report on my exploration of human/tree portraiture in early 20th century photography, as culled from the Gerald W. Williams Collection [at the Valley Library]. This genre includes photographs usually taken to emphasize the tree’s grand majesty, beauty, strangeness and/or size compared to the relative smallness of a person, as well as those that show off the human’s bravado and skills in cutting them down. The title of my talk references both the rings inside a tree’s trunk that indicate its age, as well as a type of picture in which people hold hands and form a ring around a tree, sometimes to show its size and sometimes to protect it. —Melody Owen

The Valley Library has another resident scholar lecture coming up soon. Melody Owen is a visual artist based in Portland that has shown her work all across the country as well as in Europe. She has completed residencies in France, Switzerland, and Iceland among several other locations. 

Owen conducted research in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center last autumn and focused on historic images of foresters and others working in the woods. Her talk titled “Tree Rings” will be delivered on Thursday, June 16 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East Room on the library’s third floor. We’ll hope to see you there, and her description of her presentation is below. 

This talk will report on my exploration of human/tree portraiture in early 20th century photography, as culled from the Gerald W. Williams Collection [at the Valley Library]. This genre includes photographs usually taken to emphasize the tree’s grand majesty, beauty, strangeness and/or size compared to the relative smallness of a person, as well as those that show off the human’s bravado and skills in cutting them down. The title of my talk references both the rings inside a tree’s trunk that indicate its age, as well as a type of picture in which people hold hands and form a ring around a tree, sometimes to show its size and sometimes to protect it. —Melody Owen

The Valley Library has another resident scholar lecture coming up soon. Melody Owen is a visual artist based in Portland that has shown her work all across the country as well as in Europe. She has completed residencies in France, Switzerland, and Iceland among several other locations. 

Owen conducted research in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center last autumn and focused on historic images of foresters and others working in the woods. Her talk titled “Tree Rings” will be delivered on Thursday, June 16 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East Room on the library’s third floor. We’ll hope to see you there, and her description of her presentation is below. 

This talk will report on my exploration of human/tree portraiture in early 20th century photography, as culled from the Gerald W. Williams Collection [at the Valley Library]. This genre includes photographs usually taken to emphasize the tree’s grand majesty, beauty, strangeness and/or size compared to the relative smallness of a person, as well as those that show off the human’s bravado and skills in cutting them down. The title of my talk references both the rings inside a tree’s trunk that indicate its age, as well as a type of picture in which people hold hands and form a ring around a tree, sometimes to show its size and sometimes to protect it. —Melody Owen

Enjoy a brief break from studying by hanging out with the dogs. On June 2 and June 7, the Valley Library will be visited by certified therapy dogs from Welcome Waggers. Pet and visit with the dogs that will be on the library’s third floor in the Willamette Rooms. On Thursday, June 2, the friendly dogs will be here from 1:30-3:30 p.m., and then our furry friends will return on Tuesday, June 7 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. If you’re missing a particular dog or just want to meet some new ones, here’s your chance for some time with these gentle companions. 

This event is sponsored by OSU Libraries and Press along with Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).

Enjoy a brief break from studying by hanging out with the dogs. On June 2 and June 7, the Valley Library will be visited by certified therapy dogs from Welcome Waggers. Pet and visit with the dogs that will be on the library’s third floor in the Willamette Rooms. On Thursday, June 2, the friendly dogs will be here from 1:30-3:30 p.m., and then our furry friends will return on Tuesday, June 7 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. If you’re missing a particular dog or just want to meet some new ones, here’s your chance for some time with these gentle companions. 

This event is sponsored by OSU Libraries and Press along with Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).

The faculty and staff of the Valley Library invite you to attend the award ceremony for the 2015 Library Undergraduate Research Award (LURA) winner, Dakota Jacobs, a senior studying Toxicology.

Thanks to the generosity of donors Gilbert and Marie Cleasby, Jacobs is being awarded a $1,000 scholarship for his winning research paper in the sciences. 

Please join with us in this celebration that will be held in the Valley Library’s second floor Rotunda on May 25 at 2:00 p.m. Jacobs will give a short talk about how he selected his topic and how his research was done. His winning paper is entitled “Generation of Kisspeptin Cell Lines to Investigate the Sex Steroid-Mediated Initiation of Puberty.” 

Cheryl A. Middleton, associate university librarian for learning and engagement at the Oregon State University Libraries and Press, has been elected vice-president/president-elect of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). She will become president-elect following the 2016 American Library Association Annual Conference and assume the presidency in July 2017 for a one-year term. 

Middleton has served at OSU Libraries and Press (OSULP) for more than 30 years in a number of roles. “I look forward to sharing the innovative work that OSULP is engaged in with the ACRL leadership and membership to impact learner success,” said Middleton, “and including OSULP and other Pacific Northwest academic libraries in the significant work and initiatives that ACRL conducts on behalf of the academic library community. 

“It is an honor to be elected as the vice-president/president-elect of ACRL. I appreciate the opportunity to build on the legacy of the leaders before me. They helped shape the organization that is considered the vanguard for excellence in academic and research libraries. Over the next three years, I look forward to working with the membership, board, and staff of ACRL. I want to thank everyone involved in making this possible and will strive to serve the ACRL community with commitment, enthusiasm and respect.” 

“I am delighted to have Cheryl join the board as vice-president/president-elect,” ACRL executive director Mary Ellen K. Davis said. “She has made valuable contributions to ACRL including serving and chairing many committees, most recently the Research Planning and Review Committee, which identifies key trends in academic and research librarianship and higher education as well as conducting an environmental scan. Her knowledge of academic librarianship and higher education along with as her extensive record of service will be a great asset to the board.” 

Middleton earned her master’s in Library Information Science from Louisiana State University, and she holds a B.S. in General Science from Oregon State University.

  

Source: News release issued by the Association of College and Research Libraries

Cheryl A. Middleton, associate university librarian for learning and engagement at the Oregon State University Libraries and Press, has been elected vice-president/president-elect of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). She will become president-elect following the 2016 American Library Association Annual Conference and assume the presidency in July 2017 for a one-year term. 

Middleton has served at OSU Libraries and Press (OSULP) for more than 30 years in a number of roles. “I look forward to sharing the innovative work that OSULP is engaged in with the ACRL leadership and membership to impact learner success,” said Middleton, “and including OSULP and other Pacific Northwest academic libraries in the significant work and initiatives that ACRL conducts on behalf of the academic library community. 

“It is an honor to be elected as the vice-president/president-elect of ACRL. I appreciate the opportunity to build on the legacy of the leaders before me. They helped shape the organization that is considered the vanguard for excellence in academic and research libraries. Over the next three years, I look forward to working with the membership, board, and staff of ACRL. I want to thank everyone involved in making this possible and will strive to serve the ACRL community with commitment, enthusiasm and respect.” 

“I am delighted to have Cheryl join the board as vice-president/president-elect,” ACRL executive director Mary Ellen K. Davis said. “She has made valuable contributions to ACRL including serving and chairing many committees, most recently the Research Planning and Review Committee, which identifies key trends in academic and research librarianship and higher education as well as conducting an environmental scan. Her knowledge of academic librarianship and higher education along with as her extensive record of service will be a great asset to the board.” 

Middleton earned her master’s in Library Information Science from Louisiana State University, and she holds a B.S. in General Science from Oregon State University.

  

Source: News release issued by the Association of College and Research Libraries

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