Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

The library now provides access to 398 movies including powerful current films from the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America. Also in the World Cinema Streaming Video Collection are many classic American and European films from 1915 through the ‘50s including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Joan of Arc” and “Invaders from Mars.” Many revered directors are represented including Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Charlie Chaplin, Jean Renoir, Erich Stroheim, Satyajjt Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, Roberto Rosselini and Orson Welles.

To access the World Cinema Collection, go to http://proxy.library.oregonstate.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlayLists.aspx?wid=240182. Then click “View All” in the upper right corner of the Browse Subjects area, and scroll down to find the World Cinema Collection link image in the alphabetical list.

The films have subtitles or closed captioning in English, and most of those with closed captions have searchable, interactive transcripts. Movies in this collection are made available from ECampus funding to support online access to course content, and access to this collection is available until July 2016.

The library now provides access to 398 movies including powerful current films from the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America. Also in the World Cinema Streaming Video Collection are many classic American and European films from 1915 through the ‘50s including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Joan of Arc” and “Invaders from Mars.” Many revered directors are represented including Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Charlie Chaplin, Jean Renoir, Erich Stroheim, Satyajjt Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, Roberto Rosselini and Orson Welles.

To access the World Cinema Collection, go to http://proxy.library.oregonstate.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlayLists.aspx?wid=240182. Then click “View All” in the upper right corner of the Browse Subjects area, and scroll down to find the World Cinema Collection link image in the alphabetical list.

The films have subtitles or closed captioning in English, and most of those with closed captions have searchable, interactive transcripts. Movies in this collection are made available from ECampus funding to support online access to course content, and access to this collection is available until July 2016.

The library now provides access to 398 movies including powerful current films from the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America. Also in the World Cinema Streaming Video Collection are many classic American and European films from 1915 through the ‘50s including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Joan of Arc” and “Invaders from Mars.” Many revered directors are represented including Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Charlie Chaplin, Jean Renoir, Erich Stroheim, Satyajjt Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, Roberto Rosselini and Orson Welles.

To access the World Cinema Collection, go to http://proxy.library.oregonstate.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlayLists.aspx?wid=240182. Then click “View All” in the upper right corner of the Browse Subjects area, and scroll down to find the World Cinema Collection link image in the alphabetical list.

The films have subtitles or closed captioning in English, and most of those with closed captions have searchable, interactive transcripts. Movies in this collection are made available from ECampus funding to support online access to course content, and access to this collection is available until July 2016.

The library now provides access to 398 movies including powerful current films from the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America. Also in the World Cinema Streaming Video Collection are many classic American and European films from 1915 through the ‘50s including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Joan of Arc” and “Invaders from Mars.” Many revered directors are represented including Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Charlie Chaplin, Jean Renoir, Erich Stroheim, Satyajjt Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, Roberto Rosselini and Orson Welles.

To access the World Cinema Collection, go to http://proxy.library.oregonstate.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlayLists.aspx?wid=240182. Then click “View All” in the upper right corner of the Browse Subjects area, and scroll down to find the World Cinema Collection link image in the alphabetical list.

The films have subtitles or closed captioning in English, and most of those with closed captions have searchable, interactive transcripts. Movies in this collection are made available from ECampus funding to support online access to course content, and access to this collection is available until July 2016.

The library now provides access to 398 movies including powerful current films from the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America. Also in the World Cinema Streaming Video Collection are many classic American and European films from 1915 through the ‘50s including “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Joan of Arc” and “Invaders from Mars.” Many revered directors are represented including Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Charlie Chaplin, Jean Renoir, Erich Stroheim, Satyajjt Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, Roberto Rosselini and Orson Welles.

To access the World Cinema Collection, go to http://proxy.library.oregonstate.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlayLists.aspx?wid=240182. Then click “View All” in the upper right corner of the Browse Subjects area, and scroll down to find the World Cinema Collection link image in the alphabetical list.

The films have subtitles or closed captioning in English, and most of those with closed captions have searchable, interactive transcripts. Movies in this collection are made available from ECampus funding to support online access to course content, and access to this collection is available until July 2016.

The next library faculty seminar will be held on December 11 at 10 a.m. in the Willamette Rooms on the Valley Library’s third floor. Anne Bahde from the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center will present “Reimagining the Archival Finding Aid using Digital Humanities Visualization Techniques.” Hope to see you there. 

Here’s the description of the seminar’s content: Traditional archival finding aids have long been criticized for their usability challenges. This presentation will demonstrate a reimagined model of this genre incorporating network graphs, timelines and maps to encourage and enable exploration of archival collections. Preliminary results of user focus groups and surveys will be presented along with ideas for further enhancements to the archival research experience.

The next library faculty seminar will be held on December 11 at 10 a.m. in the Willamette Rooms on the Valley Library’s third floor. Anne Bahde from the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center will present “Reimagining the Archival Finding Aid using Digital Humanities Visualization Techniques.” Hope to see you there. 

Here’s the description of the seminar’s content: Traditional archival finding aids have long been criticized for their usability challenges. This presentation will demonstrate a reimagined model of this genre incorporating network graphs, timelines and maps to encourage and enable exploration of archival collections. Preliminary results of user focus groups and surveys will be presented along with ideas for further enhancements to the archival research experience.

The next library faculty seminar will be held on December 11 at 10 a.m. in the Willamette Rooms on the Valley Library’s third floor. Anne Bahde from the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center will present “Reimagining the Archival Finding Aid using Digital Humanities Visualization Techniques.” Hope to see you there. 

Here’s the description of the seminar’s content: Traditional archival finding aids have long been criticized for their usability challenges. This presentation will demonstrate a reimagined model of this genre incorporating network graphs, timelines and maps to encourage and enable exploration of archival collections. Preliminary results of user focus groups and surveys will be presented along with ideas for further enhancements to the archival research experience.

Please mark your calendars for the latest in the library’s series of Resident Scholar presentations, which will take place next week. Justin McBrien, a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Virginia, will discuss his research in a lecture titled “Making Climate Change: The ‘Atom Weather’ Controversy and the Question of Human Planetary Agency, 1945-1970.”  

This event will be Thursday, December 10 at 2:00 p.m. in the Reading Room of the Special Collections and Archives Research Center on the library’s fifth floor. A summary of McBrien’s talk is below. Hope to see you there. 

This presentation examines the public debate in the US during the 1940s-1960s over the potential of the nuclear explosions to affect large-scale climatic changes. The “atom weather” controversy prefigured the awareness that humans have enormous environmental impacts with the power to save or destroy life on earth. By suggesting that nuclear explosions could inadvertently trigger extreme weather and rapid climate change, believers in atom weather were early articulators of the concept of the global biosphere as a chaotic system vulnerable to disturbances. 

By the mid-1950s, a considerable proportion of the American public blamed nuclear testing for droughts, frosts and tornado outbreaks. Meteorological experts studying fallout circulation dismissed the possibility that nuclear explosions could rival nature’s most powerful forces. They assumed that the global atmosphere was a stable system that could absorb any disturbances or pollutants that humanity might produce. Yet in their attempts to justify the continuation of nuclear testing and mollify public fears, these experts began to promote the bomb’s potential to modify the climate. They advocated for ambitious programs to use “peaceful explosions” for the “good of mankind” in continental-scale “geographical engineering” schemes. 

This rhetoric seemed only to exacerbate public fears of the bomb’s potential to precipitate environmental catastrophes. Even atmospheric experts who had previously denied possibility of bomb-induced “weather modification” began to speculate about their potential to trigger an Ice Age. When testing went underground in the 1960s, these same scientists turned their attention from the circulation of radioactive fallout to that of a variety of human-caused pollutants. Their studies led to the conclusion that the public had the right idea all along, though not the right culprit: it was not nuclear testing but industrial pollution that was inadvertently modifying the global climate system. 

Please mark your calendars for the latest in the library’s series of Resident Scholar presentations, which will take place next week. Justin McBrien, a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Virginia, will discuss his research in a lecture titled “Making Climate Change: The ‘Atom Weather’ Controversy and the Question of Human Planetary Agency, 1945-1970.”  

This event will be Thursday, December 10 at 2:00 p.m. in the Reading Room of the Special Collections and Archives Research Center on the library’s fifth floor. A summary of McBrien’s talk is below. Hope to see you there. 

This presentation examines the public debate in the US during the 1940s-1960s over the potential of the nuclear explosions to affect large-scale climatic changes. The “atom weather” controversy prefigured the awareness that humans have enormous environmental impacts with the power to save or destroy life on earth. By suggesting that nuclear explosions could inadvertently trigger extreme weather and rapid climate change, believers in atom weather were early articulators of the concept of the global biosphere as a chaotic system vulnerable to disturbances. 

By the mid-1950s, a considerable proportion of the American public blamed nuclear testing for droughts, frosts and tornado outbreaks. Meteorological experts studying fallout circulation dismissed the possibility that nuclear explosions could rival nature’s most powerful forces. They assumed that the global atmosphere was a stable system that could absorb any disturbances or pollutants that humanity might produce. Yet in their attempts to justify the continuation of nuclear testing and mollify public fears, these experts began to promote the bomb’s potential to modify the climate. They advocated for ambitious programs to use “peaceful explosions” for the “good of mankind” in continental-scale “geographical engineering” schemes. 

This rhetoric seemed only to exacerbate public fears of the bomb’s potential to precipitate environmental catastrophes. Even atmospheric experts who had previously denied possibility of bomb-induced “weather modification” began to speculate about their potential to trigger an Ice Age. When testing went underground in the 1960s, these same scientists turned their attention from the circulation of radioactive fallout to that of a variety of human-caused pollutants. Their studies led to the conclusion that the public had the right idea all along, though not the right culprit: it was not nuclear testing but industrial pollution that was inadvertently modifying the global climate system. 

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