OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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The first (of five) Resident Scholar lectures for 2015 is happening on Monday, August 10. Please consider joining us if you are available. 

Dr. David Benac, associate professor of history at Western Michigan University, will be presenting his talk, “Log Rolling, Ax Throwing and the Owl: The Heritage Legacy of the Timber Industry in Oregon.” His talk on the 10th will be at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East room on the Valley Library’s third floor.  

Dr. David Benac has used his term as scholar-in-residence at the Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center to advance his research for his current book project. With this lecture, he will provide an overview of his ongoing work with special attention to how the materials at the Valley Library are helping to support and refine his book. 

The Resident Scholar Program, sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries, awards stipends of up to $2,500 per month, renewable up to three months (for a total maximum grant award of $7,500). Stipends are awarded to visiting researchers whose proposals detail a compelling potential use of the materials held in the OSU Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students as well as independent scholars are welcome to apply, and the resident scholars do a talk about their research topic at the conclusion of their residency.

According to Dr. Benac, the timber industry occupies a near-incomparable place in the heritage of Oregon, and no other industry can make a stronger claim to the state’s development. Few other states tie their economic and cultural development to the industry in such a strong way. Despite this, the timber industry is glaringly absent in efforts to commemorate the history and heritage of this corner of the Pacific Northwest. The reasons are rooted in historical patterns and conflicts, the practice of nostalgia, the cultural role of heritage and contemporary economic factors. 

This work sets out to explain the disconnect between the historical and ongoing significance of Oregon’s timber industry with its relative insignificance in contemporary commemorations. By investigating the history of a number of company-owned sawmill towns, the nuances of the industry come to light as do the ways that Oregonians commemorate and grapple with its relevance in shaping their lives, the identities of their communities and the history of the entire state. The timber towns of Bridal Veil, Gilchrist, Grand Ronde, Kinzua, Pondosa, Powers, Wendling, Westfir and Wheeler make up the core of the community studies portion of the manuscript, and Toledo, Valsetz and Vernonia serve as important additional cases for the ongoing interpretation of timber heritage.

Dr. Benac would like to add that:

I would like to thank the Oregon State University Libraries for supporting my work at this crucial juncture. As a public historian whose research revolves around the issue of place, I am drawn to investigations of how a distinct sense of place is created, interpreted and used. After several years of visits to repositories and communities in Oregon, I had enough material to formulate a theoretical analysis of these concepts for present and past timber communities in Oregon. But key elements eluded me. With a full month at my disposal, I have integrated large volumes of historical images and maps, primarily from the Gerald Williams Collection, that will be crucial in expanding my understanding of the cultural geographies of these communities. The time has also proven invaluable in allowing me to collect a series of oral histories and to visit some of the exhibitions of timber heritage that I was previously unable to schedule. With this new material, the research for my next manuscript is near complete.

The first (of five) Resident Scholar lectures for 2015 is happening on Monday, August 10. Please consider joining us if you are available. 

Dr. David Benac, associate professor of history at Western Michigan University, will be presenting his talk, “Log Rolling, Ax Throwing and the Owl: The Heritage Legacy of the Timber Industry in Oregon.” His talk on the 10th will be at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East room on the Valley Library’s third floor.  

Dr. David Benac has used his term as scholar-in-residence at the Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center to advance his research for his current book project. With this lecture, he will provide an overview of his ongoing work with special attention to how the materials at the Valley Library are helping to support and refine his book. 

The Resident Scholar Program, sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries, awards stipends of up to $2,500 per month, renewable up to three months (for a total maximum grant award of $7,500). Stipends are awarded to visiting researchers whose proposals detail a compelling potential use of the materials held in the OSU Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students as well as independent scholars are welcome to apply, and the resident scholars do a talk about their research topic at the conclusion of their residency.

According to Dr. Benac, the timber industry occupies a near-incomparable place in the heritage of Oregon, and no other industry can make a stronger claim to the state’s development. Few other states tie their economic and cultural development to the industry in such a strong way. Despite this, the timber industry is glaringly absent in efforts to commemorate the history and heritage of this corner of the Pacific Northwest. The reasons are rooted in historical patterns and conflicts, the practice of nostalgia, the cultural role of heritage and contemporary economic factors. 

This work sets out to explain the disconnect between the historical and ongoing significance of Oregon’s timber industry with its relative insignificance in contemporary commemorations. By investigating the history of a number of company-owned sawmill towns, the nuances of the industry come to light as do the ways that Oregonians commemorate and grapple with its relevance in shaping their lives, the identities of their communities and the history of the entire state. The timber towns of Bridal Veil, Gilchrist, Grand Ronde, Kinzua, Pondosa, Powers, Wendling, Westfir and Wheeler make up the core of the community studies portion of the manuscript, and Toledo, Valsetz and Vernonia serve as important additional cases for the ongoing interpretation of timber heritage.

Dr. Benac would like to add that:

I would like to thank the Oregon State University Libraries for supporting my work at this crucial juncture. As a public historian whose research revolves around the issue of place, I am drawn to investigations of how a distinct sense of place is created, interpreted and used. After several years of visits to repositories and communities in Oregon, I had enough material to formulate a theoretical analysis of these concepts for present and past timber communities in Oregon. But key elements eluded me. With a full month at my disposal, I have integrated large volumes of historical images and maps, primarily from the Gerald Williams Collection, that will be crucial in expanding my understanding of the cultural geographies of these communities. The time has also proven invaluable in allowing me to collect a series of oral histories and to visit some of the exhibitions of timber heritage that I was previously unable to schedule. With this new material, the research for my next manuscript is near complete.

On Saturday, August 1, access to Elsevier platforms will be unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance for approximately 4.5 hours starting at 3:00 p.m. The platforms involved are ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Reaxys.

On Saturday, August 1, access to Elsevier platforms will be unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance for approximately 4.5 hours starting at 3:00 p.m. The platforms involved are ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Reaxys.

On Saturday, August 1, access to Elsevier platforms will be unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance for approximately 4.5 hours starting at 3:00 p.m. The platforms involved are ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Reaxys.

On Saturday, August 1, access to Elsevier platforms will be unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance for approximately 4.5 hours starting at 3:00 p.m. The platforms involved are ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Reaxys.

"Summer Reads" is the new exhibit at the Guin Library at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The exhibit was created by library student aides Abigail Mason and Athena Botbol, and it features reading suggestions from staff at the Marine Science Center. The exhibit's background is made of folded and pasted paper from discarded books.

"Summer Reads" is the new exhibit at the Guin Library at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The exhibit was created by library student aides Abigail Mason and Athena Botbol, and it features reading suggestions from staff at the Marine Science Center. The exhibit's background is made of folded and pasted paper from discarded books.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age is now on display at the Valley Library. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” and it's located in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Reading Room on the fifth floor of the library. 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

An exhibit showcasing the many facets of the Atomic Age is now on display at the Valley Library. The exhibit is called “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” and it's located in the exhibit gallery at the Archives Research Reading Room on the fifth floor of the library. 

2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries is honoring this anniversary with an exhibit featuring a wide-ranging selection of primary source materials from our rich collections documenting nuclear history. According to Larry Landis, the director of Special Collections and the Archives Research Center, OSU Libraries holds “one of the strongest nuclear history collections in the western U.S.” 

The materials in the exhibit demonstrate the complexities, concerns and contradictions of many aspects of nuclear history since the atomic bomb was dropped. Topics such as international cooperation, environmental consequences and scientific advances are explored using diverse examples of original materials such as comics, Geiger counters, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from famous antinuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

 “At the 70-year mark,” says exhibit co-curator Jake Hamblin, a professor in OSU’s History of Science program, “I think more people are ready to grasp the full range of issues connected with the first use of atomic bombs and the subsequent history of nuclear power, bombs, proliferation, health effects and environment impacts.” 

The exhibit was team-curated by Hamblin, History of Science Librarian Anne Bahde, and three History of Science graduate students. The exhibit is on view through March 1, 2016. In conjunction with this exhibit, there will be related activities including a speaking event by Hiroshima survivor Dr. Hideko Tamura Snider at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on October 22.

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