Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

The William H. Galvani Rare Maps Collection of more than 1,000 maps depicting various regions of the globe from antiquity to the 20th century is now available for research at the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Included in Galvani’s generous bequest of his personal library to the university, it is one of the library’s largest map collections. See the list of maps in the Galvani Collection at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/findingaids/?p=collections/findingaid&id=2110. 

This impressive cultural resource will support the research interests of students, professors, historians, literary scholars, military enthusiasts, geographers, cartographers and artists. The broad temporal and geographical scope of the maps represents Galvani’s interests as a voracious private collector, and this maps collection will now serve to enhance learning and teaching opportunities.   

Predominantly focused on military history from the 18th and 19th centuries, the collection depicts the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, the United States Civil War, the Crimean War, the Russo-Japanese War, the Spanish-American War and the Italian War of Independence. Additionally, the collection records the military and sociopolitical history of France, England, and ancient Greece and Rome. Reflecting his professional background as a civil engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway, Galvani’s collection also includes topographical surveys of the Adirondacks, military surveys of Cuba, railway and telegraphic lines in Africa, and Captain Cook’s circumnavigation route.   

The collection is categorized into seven geographical series (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, World, and miscellaneous). Within each series, the maps are grouped by an identifiable bibliographic source, as many of the maps were originally part of books or publications. Notable sources of the maps include: “Viaje del Joven Anacarsis á la Grecia a mediados del siglo cuarto antes de la era vulgar” (“Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece”), by Juan Jacobo Barthelemy, 1845; “Histoire de Polybe,” 1753; and the “U.S. Military Governor of Cuba Report, 1900-1902.” Each item entry includes available information about the various map creators, such as the engraver, lithographer, cartographer, printer or publisher. The majority of the maps are not in English, so the addition of specific geographic location information aims to help researchers locate relevant maps within a given series.

Elizabeth Nielsen and Chris Petersen, two librarians in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at the Valley Library, are winners of university awards for 2016. They will be honored along with others at the University Day celebration on September 19. 

Elizabeth Nielsen is the winner of the OSU Professional Faculty Excellence Award, and Chris Petersen is the winner of the Outstanding Faculty Research Assistant Award. Their work epitomizes many core values of OSU Libraries and Press. 

“Elizabeth Nielsen's twenty-five years of service to OSU have been consistently exceptional,” according to Larry Landis, Director of the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at the Valley Library. “For many years, she has coordinated the Special Collections and Archives Research Center's work with making collections ready for researcher use. Within that scope, she has mentored and worked with many student assistants, providing them with meaningful experiential learning opportunities. More recently, she worked with campus partners to create a new university records retention policy and schedule. A colleague in the Orbis Cascade Alliance characterized Elizabeth as ‘unafraid to work hard’ and ‘genuinely innovative.’” 

“I am humbled and honored to receive this recognition,” acknowledged Elizabeth Nielsen. “My colleagues in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center and the OSU Libraries and Press are fabulous and, in my view, the best on campus. Their encouragement and collaboration are integral to my accomplishments. My deep thanks to Larry Landis for the nomination and to those who wrote letters of support.” 

“Chris Petersen has engaged in a broad range of work activities during his time with the OSU Libraries and Press,” notes Larry Landis, “from serving as co-editor of the six-volume work, ‘The Pauling Catalogue — Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers at Oregon State University’ to managing the recent OSU Sesquicentennial Oral History Project. Two qualities have been consistent throughout all of his work: professionalism and innovation.” 

Says Chris Petersen about the award: “It’s very gratifying to have my work acknowledged with this award. OSU has been a wonderful place to build a career, and I’ve been fortunate to collaborate with some truly outstanding colleagues in pursuing a number of really interesting projects. Working here also happens to be a lot of fun, so I feel doubly blessed to find myself where I am. To say that Oregon State has played a significant role in my life would be a vast understatement, and I look forward to doing what I can to advance its ambitions in the years to come.” 

New to campus and unfamiliar with the Valley Library? In addition to the "Floor Maps" link on the upper right of the homepage, we also have an updated brochure that contains a map of each floor in the library to make your wayfinding much easier.

The oversize brochure is located in the brochure rack that is on the left as you enter the library's main entrance and elsewhere within the library. The brochure is called, "The Valley Library Services and Floor Maps." And you can always ask for directions from any library staff or faculty person when you'd like directions. 

Don't leave your backpack or electronics unattended in the library or in other public areas on campus as thefts do occur. 

If you’d like to store your items in a secure place at the library, lockers are located throughout the Valley Library and may be reserved at Circulation on the second floor near the library’s main entrance. 

If you see a theft or other crime in progress, immediately call 541-737-7000. For non-emergencies, such as to report a theft after it has occurred, call OSU Security at 541-737-3010.

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning at one of the workshops on 8/18. 

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning at one of the workshops on 8/18. 

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

We’re almost all both producing and using content regularly. Get a handle on balancing Copyright and Fair Use in Education on 8/15. Check out SPSS Statistics Basics on 8/16 if you have no experience or limited experience using this program for basic descriptive statistics (originally known as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Want to dig a bit deeper? Check out SPSS Statistics Intermediate on 8/17.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

We’re almost all both producing and using content regularly. Get a handle on balancing Copyright and Fair Use in Education on 8/15. Check out SPSS Statistics Basics on 8/16 if you have no experience or limited experience using this program for basic descriptive statistics (originally known as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Want to dig a bit deeper? Check out SPSS Statistics Intermediate on 8/17.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Our next Resident Scholar lecture will be happening on Friday, August 5 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette West room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Our speaker this time is Dr. Michael Kenny, professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. 

Dr. Kenny has been working with the Pauling Papers in developing his talk, “‘Fear of the Mutant: Recessive Genes and Racial Degeneration in the Nuclear Fallout Debate.” An abstract of this presentation is below. We hope to see you there. 

By the 1950s geneticists had come to partially understand the role that recessive genes play in certain hereditary disorders, some of which were obvious (such as sickle cell anemia), and others presumably concealed within morbidity and mortality statistics. These possible latent effects were very much on the minds of those — such as Hermann Muller, Linus Pauling and George Beadle — who were critical of atmospheric nuclear testing. Their concern was a latter-day expression of what had been a long-standing obsession of the eugenics movement: the fear of cumulative racial degeneration and decline. This presentation examines how these ideas were articulated in the context of the nuclear fallout debate.

Our next Resident Scholar lecture will be happening on Friday, August 5 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette West room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Our speaker this time is Dr. Michael Kenny, professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. 

Dr. Kenny has been working with the Pauling Papers in developing his talk, “‘Fear of the Mutant: Recessive Genes and Racial Degeneration in the Nuclear Fallout Debate.” An abstract of this presentation is below. We hope to see you there. 

By the 1950s geneticists had come to partially understand the role that recessive genes play in certain hereditary disorders, some of which were obvious (such as sickle cell anemia), and others presumably concealed within morbidity and mortality statistics. These possible latent effects were very much on the minds of those — such as Hermann Muller, Linus Pauling and George Beadle — who were critical of atmospheric nuclear testing. Their concern was a latter-day expression of what had been a long-standing obsession of the eugenics movement: the fear of cumulative racial degeneration and decline. This presentation examines how these ideas were articulated in the context of the nuclear fallout debate.

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