OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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The Resident Scholar program, sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries, awards stipends of up to $2,500 per month to visiting researchers whose proposals detail a compelling potential use of the materials held in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Three scholars have been selected for summer 2016.  

Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students as well as independent scholars are welcome to apply, and the resident scholars do a talk about their research topic at the conclusion of their residency.  

Our next Resident Scholar lecture has been scheduled for July 14. Jason Hogstad recently completed his master’s degree in History at Washington State University, and he will be entering into the doctoral program at Colorado in the fall. He has been poring over microfilm reels for the better part of a month in support of his topic. 

Hogstad’s talk, “War on Rabbits Begins Sunday: Ritual Rabbit Slaughter and the Extension Service in Eastern Oregon, 1900-1925,” will take place on Thursday, July 14 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East Room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Below is Hogstad’s description of his lecture. Please consider joining us if you are available. 

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During the early twentieth-century, would-be farmers poured into the arid portions of Oregon east of the Cascade Mountains, eager to transform the so-called “high desert” into an agricultural eden. But their efforts had an unintended consequence: jackrabbits thrived on the newly-planted crops and their numbers soon threatened farmers’ success. Fearing ruin, farmers repeatedly turned to nearby townspeople and distant city dwellers for aid. Regional newspapers publicized the farmers’ plight and encouraged their readers to take part in rabbit drives: cooperative, celebratory pest control activities in which participants chased, corralled, and bludgeoned jackrabbits by the thousands. But, the drives were too isolated and the events themselves too sporadic. Jackrabbit numbers did not decline. 

This stalemate changed with the arrival of county agents and the Oregon Agricultural College’s (OAC) Extension Service in the late 1910s. Armed with strychnine and determined to teach proper pest control methods to Eastern Oregon farmers, representatives from the OAC transformed the ways that Oregonians responded to agricultural crisis. Instead of working together and recruiting outsiders, farmers now reported rabbit infestations to their local county agent, who organized poison campaigns. “‘War on Rabbits Begins Sunday’” explores the social and cultural impact of these two forms of pest control, arguing that the transition from communal rabbit drives to state-directed poisoning reflected a shift in how Eastern Oregonians responded to environmental crisis, understood their relationship with the state, and defined their relationship with the natural world.

The Resident Scholar program, sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries, awards stipends of up to $2,500 per month to visiting researchers whose proposals detail a compelling potential use of the materials held in the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Three scholars have been selected for summer 2016.  

Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students as well as independent scholars are welcome to apply, and the resident scholars do a talk about their research topic at the conclusion of their residency.  

Our next Resident Scholar lecture has been scheduled for July 14. Jason Hogstad recently completed his master’s degree in History at Washington State University, and he will be entering into the doctoral program at Colorado in the fall. He has been poring over microfilm reels for the better part of a month in support of his topic. 

Hogstad’s talk, “War on Rabbits Begins Sunday: Ritual Rabbit Slaughter and the Extension Service in Eastern Oregon, 1900-1925,” will take place on Thursday, July 14 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette East Room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Below is Hogstad’s description of his lecture. Please consider joining us if you are available. 

*** 

During the early twentieth-century, would-be farmers poured into the arid portions of Oregon east of the Cascade Mountains, eager to transform the so-called “high desert” into an agricultural eden. But their efforts had an unintended consequence: jackrabbits thrived on the newly-planted crops and their numbers soon threatened farmers’ success. Fearing ruin, farmers repeatedly turned to nearby townspeople and distant city dwellers for aid. Regional newspapers publicized the farmers’ plight and encouraged their readers to take part in rabbit drives: cooperative, celebratory pest control activities in which participants chased, corralled, and bludgeoned jackrabbits by the thousands. But, the drives were too isolated and the events themselves too sporadic. Jackrabbit numbers did not decline. 

This stalemate changed with the arrival of county agents and the Oregon Agricultural College’s (OAC) Extension Service in the late 1910s. Armed with strychnine and determined to teach proper pest control methods to Eastern Oregon farmers, representatives from the OAC transformed the ways that Oregonians responded to agricultural crisis. Instead of working together and recruiting outsiders, farmers now reported rabbit infestations to their local county agent, who organized poison campaigns. “‘War on Rabbits Begins Sunday’” explores the social and cultural impact of these two forms of pest control, arguing that the transition from communal rabbit drives to state-directed poisoning reflected a shift in how Eastern Oregonians responded to environmental crisis, understood their relationship with the state, and defined their relationship with the natural world.

Wrangle your citations into shape with Zotero (Intermediate and Advanced) on 7/19, an excellent online tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Wrangle your citations into shape with Zotero (Intermediate and Advanced) on 7/19, an excellent online tool for capturing, managing and citing your research sources.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The William H. Galvani Rare Maps Collection of more than 1,000 maps depicting various regions of the globe from antiquity to the 20th century is now available for research at the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Included in Galvani’s generous bequest of his personal library to the university, it is one of the library’s largest map collections. See the list of maps in the Galvani Collection at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/findingaids/?p=collections/findingaid&id=2110. 

This impressive cultural resource will support the research interests of students, professors, historians, literary scholars, military enthusiasts, geographers, cartographers and artists. The broad temporal and geographical scope of the maps represents Galvani’s interests as a voracious private collector, and this maps collection will now serve to enhance learning and teaching opportunities.   

Predominantly focused on military history from the 18th and 19th centuries, the collection depicts the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, the United States Civil War, the Crimean War, the Russo-Japanese War, the Spanish-American War and the Italian War of Independence. Additionally, the collection records the military and sociopolitical history of France, England, and ancient Greece and Rome. Reflecting his professional background as a civil engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway, Galvani’s collection also includes topographical surveys of the Adirondacks, military surveys of Cuba, railway and telegraphic lines in Africa, and Captain Cook’s circumnavigation route.   

The collection is categorized into seven geographical series (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, World, and miscellaneous). Within each series, the maps are grouped by an identifiable bibliographic source, as many of the maps were originally part of books or publications. Notable sources of the maps include: “Viaje del Joven Anacarsis á la Grecia a mediados del siglo cuarto antes de la era vulgar” (“Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece”), by Juan Jacobo Barthelemy, 1845; “Histoire de Polybe,” 1753; and the “U.S. Military Governor of Cuba Report, 1900-1902.” Each item entry includes available information about the various map creators, such as the engraver, lithographer, cartographer, printer or publisher. The majority of the maps are not in English, so the addition of specific geographic location information aims to help researchers locate relevant maps within a given series.

The William H. Galvani Rare Maps Collection of more than 1,000 maps depicting various regions of the globe from antiquity to the 20th century is now available for research at the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Included in Galvani’s generous bequest of his personal library to the university, it is one of the library’s largest map collections. See the list of maps in the Galvani Collection at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/findingaids/?p=collections/findingaid&id=2110. 

This impressive cultural resource will support the research interests of students, professors, historians, literary scholars, military enthusiasts, geographers, cartographers and artists. The broad temporal and geographical scope of the maps represents Galvani’s interests as a voracious private collector, and this maps collection will now serve to enhance learning and teaching opportunities.   

Predominantly focused on military history from the 18th and 19th centuries, the collection depicts the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, the United States Civil War, the Crimean War, the Russo-Japanese War, the Spanish-American War and the Italian War of Independence. Additionally, the collection records the military and sociopolitical history of France, England, and ancient Greece and Rome. Reflecting his professional background as a civil engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway, Galvani’s collection also includes topographical surveys of the Adirondacks, military surveys of Cuba, railway and telegraphic lines in Africa, and Captain Cook’s circumnavigation route.   

The collection is categorized into seven geographical series (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, World, and miscellaneous). Within each series, the maps are grouped by an identifiable bibliographic source, as many of the maps were originally part of books or publications. Notable sources of the maps include: “Viaje del Joven Anacarsis á la Grecia a mediados del siglo cuarto antes de la era vulgar” (“Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece”), by Juan Jacobo Barthelemy, 1845; “Histoire de Polybe,” 1753; and the “U.S. Military Governor of Cuba Report, 1900-1902.” Each item entry includes available information about the various map creators, such as the engraver, lithographer, cartographer, printer or publisher. The majority of the maps are not in English, so the addition of specific geographic location information aims to help researchers locate relevant maps within a given series.

The William H. Galvani Rare Maps Collection of more than 1,000 maps depicting various regions of the globe from antiquity to the 20th century is now available for research at the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Included in Galvani’s generous bequest of his personal library to the university, it is one of the library’s largest map collections. See the list of maps in the Galvani Collection at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/findingaids/?p=collections/findingaid&id=2110. 

This impressive cultural resource will support the research interests of students, professors, historians, literary scholars, military enthusiasts, geographers, cartographers and artists. The broad temporal and geographical scope of the maps represents Galvani’s interests as a voracious private collector, and this maps collection will now serve to enhance learning and teaching opportunities.   

Predominantly focused on military history from the 18th and 19th centuries, the collection depicts the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, the United States Civil War, the Crimean War, the Russo-Japanese War, the Spanish-American War and the Italian War of Independence. Additionally, the collection records the military and sociopolitical history of France, England, and ancient Greece and Rome. Reflecting his professional background as a civil engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway, Galvani’s collection also includes topographical surveys of the Adirondacks, military surveys of Cuba, railway and telegraphic lines in Africa, and Captain Cook’s circumnavigation route.   

The collection is categorized into seven geographical series (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, World, and miscellaneous). Within each series, the maps are grouped by an identifiable bibliographic source, as many of the maps were originally part of books or publications. Notable sources of the maps include: “Viaje del Joven Anacarsis á la Grecia a mediados del siglo cuarto antes de la era vulgar” (“Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece”), by Juan Jacobo Barthelemy, 1845; “Histoire de Polybe,” 1753; and the “U.S. Military Governor of Cuba Report, 1900-1902.” Each item entry includes available information about the various map creators, such as the engraver, lithographer, cartographer, printer or publisher. The majority of the maps are not in English, so the addition of specific geographic location information aims to help researchers locate relevant maps within a given series.

Apply now to attend OpenCon 2016 on November 12-14 in Washington, DC. Oregon State University Libraries and Press will sponsor one graduate student to attend this international conference on open access to information. Please fill out the form at https://secure.opencon2016.org/referral/oregonstate by August 31 to be considered for the OSU scholarship. And if you submit your application before July 11, you will also be considered for a general scholarship.

OpenCon seeks to bring together students and early career professionals from around the world who want to advance open access, open education and open data — regardless of their ability to pay for travel costs. In 2014 and 2015, the majority of students and early career academic professionals who participated did receive travel scholarships, which enabled attendees from 39 countries to be represented. If you are awarded the OSU scholarship, it will cover your round-trip flight, lodging during the conference, and registration cost (which includes most meals). 

A program of keynotes, panels, workshops, hackathons, and meetings with policy makers will build participants’ skills in key areas, and many attendees consider OpenCon the best conference they’ve ever attended. Previous speakers have included Jimmy Wales (co-founder of Wikipedia) and Amy Rosenbaum (director of Legislative Affairs to the President of the United States). The most important criteria when applying is an interest in advancing open access, open education and open data and a commitment to taking action. 

Rachael Kuintzle, OSU graduate research assistant and OpenCon 2015 scholarship recipient, had this to say about her OpenCon experience: “It was such an honor to be there among all the amazing movers and shakers in the open movement. I made some connections that I hope will last throughout my professional life, and I got fresh ideas for ways to make more of a difference. Even though I didn’t need to be convinced of the value of open science, I found myself to be challenged daily by the practices of other scientists and educators who are truly living out the open mission every day.” 

If you have questions about the OpenCon scholarship offered by OSU Libraries and Press, email them to michaela.willihooper@oregonstate.edu.

Apply now to attend OpenCon 2016 on November 12-14 in Washington, DC. Oregon State University Libraries and Press will sponsor one graduate student to attend this international conference on open access to information. Please fill out the form at https://secure.opencon2016.org/referral/oregonstate by August 31 to be considered for the OSU scholarship. And if you submit your application before July 11, you will also be considered for a general scholarship.

OpenCon seeks to bring together students and early career professionals from around the world who want to advance open access, open education and open data — regardless of their ability to pay for travel costs. In 2014 and 2015, the majority of students and early career academic professionals who participated did receive travel scholarships, which enabled attendees from 39 countries to be represented. If you are awarded the OSU scholarship, it will cover your round-trip flight, lodging during the conference, and registration cost (which includes most meals). 

A program of keynotes, panels, workshops, hackathons, and meetings with policy makers will build participants’ skills in key areas, and many attendees consider OpenCon the best conference they’ve ever attended. Previous speakers have included Jimmy Wales (co-founder of Wikipedia) and Amy Rosenbaum (director of Legislative Affairs to the President of the United States). The most important criteria when applying is an interest in advancing open access, open education and open data and a commitment to taking action. 

Rachael Kuintzle, OSU graduate research assistant and OpenCon 2015 scholarship recipient, had this to say about her OpenCon experience: “It was such an honor to be there among all the amazing movers and shakers in the open movement. I made some connections that I hope will last throughout my professional life, and I got fresh ideas for ways to make more of a difference. Even though I didn’t need to be convinced of the value of open science, I found myself to be challenged daily by the practices of other scientists and educators who are truly living out the open mission every day.” 

If you have questions about the OpenCon scholarship offered by OSU Libraries and Press, email them to michaela.willihooper@oregonstate.edu.

Apply now to attend OpenCon 2016 on November 12-14 in Washington, DC. Oregon State University Libraries and Press will sponsor one graduate student to attend this international conference on open access to information. Please fill out the form at https://secure.opencon2016.org/referral/oregonstate by August 31 to be considered for the OSU scholarship. And if you submit your application before July 11, you will also be considered for a general scholarship.

OpenCon seeks to bring together students and early career professionals from around the world who want to advance open access, open education and open data — regardless of their ability to pay for travel costs. In 2014 and 2015, the majority of students and early career academic professionals who participated did receive travel scholarships, which enabled attendees from 39 countries to be represented. If you are awarded the OSU scholarship, it will cover your round-trip flight, lodging during the conference, and registration cost (which includes most meals). 

A program of keynotes, panels, workshops, hackathons, and meetings with policy makers will build participants’ skills in key areas, and many attendees consider OpenCon the best conference they’ve ever attended. Previous speakers have included Jimmy Wales (co-founder of Wikipedia) and Amy Rosenbaum (director of Legislative Affairs to the President of the United States). The most important criteria when applying is an interest in advancing open access, open education and open data and a commitment to taking action. 

Rachael Kuintzle, OSU graduate research assistant and OpenCon 2015 scholarship recipient, had this to say about her OpenCon experience: “It was such an honor to be there among all the amazing movers and shakers in the open movement. I made some connections that I hope will last throughout my professional life, and I got fresh ideas for ways to make more of a difference. Even though I didn’t need to be convinced of the value of open science, I found myself to be challenged daily by the practices of other scientists and educators who are truly living out the open mission every day.” 

If you have questions about the OpenCon scholarship offered by OSU Libraries and Press, email them to michaela.willihooper@oregonstate.edu.

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