OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Ecampus News

Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

OSU's Valley Library is partnering with the Student Sustainability Initiative to hire a student compost and recycling fellow for the 2016-17 academic year. The Valley Library compost and recycling fellow will work to develop an educational campaign to highlight the library's composting and recycling options for waste diversion.

The full position description is on the Student Sustainability Initiative website.

Applications are due by September 2.

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning at one of the workshops on 8/18. 

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Satisfy your curiosity about 3-D Printing and Scanning at one of the workshops on 8/18. 

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

We’re almost all both producing and using content regularly. Get a handle on balancing Copyright and Fair Use in Education on 8/15. Check out SPSS Statistics Basics on 8/16 if you have no experience or limited experience using this program for basic descriptive statistics (originally known as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Want to dig a bit deeper? Check out SPSS Statistics Intermediate on 8/17.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

We’re almost all both producing and using content regularly. Get a handle on balancing Copyright and Fair Use in Education on 8/15. Check out SPSS Statistics Basics on 8/16 if you have no experience or limited experience using this program for basic descriptive statistics (originally known as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Want to dig a bit deeper? Check out SPSS Statistics Intermediate on 8/17.

View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops. Registration is encouraged but not required. 

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Our next Resident Scholar lecture will be happening on Friday, August 5 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette West room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Our speaker this time is Dr. Michael Kenny, professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. 

Dr. Kenny has been working with the Pauling Papers in developing his talk, “‘Fear of the Mutant: Recessive Genes and Racial Degeneration in the Nuclear Fallout Debate.” An abstract of this presentation is below. We hope to see you there. 

By the 1950s geneticists had come to partially understand the role that recessive genes play in certain hereditary disorders, some of which were obvious (such as sickle cell anemia), and others presumably concealed within morbidity and mortality statistics. These possible latent effects were very much on the minds of those — such as Hermann Muller, Linus Pauling and George Beadle — who were critical of atmospheric nuclear testing. Their concern was a latter-day expression of what had been a long-standing obsession of the eugenics movement: the fear of cumulative racial degeneration and decline. This presentation examines how these ideas were articulated in the context of the nuclear fallout debate.

Our next Resident Scholar lecture will be happening on Friday, August 5 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette West room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Our speaker this time is Dr. Michael Kenny, professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. 

Dr. Kenny has been working with the Pauling Papers in developing his talk, “‘Fear of the Mutant: Recessive Genes and Racial Degeneration in the Nuclear Fallout Debate.” An abstract of this presentation is below. We hope to see you there. 

By the 1950s geneticists had come to partially understand the role that recessive genes play in certain hereditary disorders, some of which were obvious (such as sickle cell anemia), and others presumably concealed within morbidity and mortality statistics. These possible latent effects were very much on the minds of those — such as Hermann Muller, Linus Pauling and George Beadle — who were critical of atmospheric nuclear testing. Their concern was a latter-day expression of what had been a long-standing obsession of the eugenics movement: the fear of cumulative racial degeneration and decline. This presentation examines how these ideas were articulated in the context of the nuclear fallout debate.

Our next Resident Scholar lecture will be happening on Friday, August 5 at 2:00 p.m. in the Willamette West room on the Valley Library’s third floor. Our speaker this time is Dr. Michael Kenny, professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. 

Dr. Kenny has been working with the Pauling Papers in developing his talk, “‘Fear of the Mutant: Recessive Genes and Racial Degeneration in the Nuclear Fallout Debate.” An abstract of this presentation is below. We hope to see you there. 

By the 1950s geneticists had come to partially understand the role that recessive genes play in certain hereditary disorders, some of which were obvious (such as sickle cell anemia), and others presumably concealed within morbidity and mortality statistics. These possible latent effects were very much on the minds of those — such as Hermann Muller, Linus Pauling and George Beadle — who were critical of atmospheric nuclear testing. Their concern was a latter-day expression of what had been a long-standing obsession of the eugenics movement: the fear of cumulative racial degeneration and decline. This presentation examines how these ideas were articulated in the context of the nuclear fallout debate.

The Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives at the Valley Library is celebrating its third year and expanded collecting areas. In August 2013, the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center established the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives (OHBA), the first archives in the country dedicated to collecting materials related to the history of hops and craft brewing.

To meet the needs of researchers, the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives is broadening its reach to include the history of home brewing, cider, mead, barley farming and research, and the pre-Prohibition eras.

To celebrate the expansion of the collecting areas and the three-year anniversary, OHBA is releasing a photo per day for three months beginning on August 1. The photos will be on “The Brewstorian” blog (http://thebrewstorian.tumblr.com/) and OHBA's Twitter and Facebook pages.

"We are so proud of the support we've gotten over the past three years and are excited to broaden our collecting areas to cover more topics, more time periods, and more territories," stated Tiah Edmunson-Morton, an archivist at the Valley Library and the curator for the library’s Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives (OHBA).

The archives includes the papers of world-renowned beer historian Fred Eckhardt; oral histories with growers, brewers and scientists; the records of the Oregon Hop Growers Association; extensive industry periodicals and book collections; homebrew club newsletters; photographs; memorabilia and advertising materials from Oregon breweries; and OSU research on plant disease, breeding and processing that dates to the 1890s.

“OBHA is an archive unlike any other — one that allows scholars to research seriously the craft beer revolution and the rich agricultural history of hops upon which good beer rests,” says Peter A. Kopp, author of “Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.”

More info about the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives collections is at http://guides.library.oregonstate.edu/brewingarchives

The Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives at the Valley Library is celebrating its third year and expanded collecting areas. In August 2013, the library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center established the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives (OHBA), the first archives in the country dedicated to collecting materials related to the history of hops and craft brewing.

To meet the needs of researchers, the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives is broadening its reach to include the history of home brewing, cider, mead, barley farming and research, and the pre-Prohibition eras.

To celebrate the expansion of the collecting areas and the three-year anniversary, OHBA is releasing a photo per day for three months beginning on August 1. The photos will be on “The Brewstorian” blog (http://thebrewstorian.tumblr.com/) and OHBA's Twitter and Facebook pages.

"We are so proud of the support we've gotten over the past three years and are excited to broaden our collecting areas to cover more topics, more time periods, and more territories," stated Tiah Edmunson-Morton, an archivist at the Valley Library and the curator for the library’s Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives (OHBA).

The archives includes the papers of world-renowned beer historian Fred Eckhardt; oral histories with growers, brewers and scientists; the records of the Oregon Hop Growers Association; extensive industry periodicals and book collections; homebrew club newsletters; photographs; memorabilia and advertising materials from Oregon breweries; and OSU research on plant disease, breeding and processing that dates to the 1890s.

“OBHA is an archive unlike any other — one that allows scholars to research seriously the craft beer revolution and the rich agricultural history of hops upon which good beer rests,” says Peter A. Kopp, author of “Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.”

More info about the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives collections is at http://guides.library.oregonstate.edu/brewingarchives

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